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collababortion

wOrK tOgEtHeR tO rUiN sHiT

Posts tagged women

Apr 21 '14

joekeatinge:

So, this exists.

image

My pal Landry (as I understand it, please correct me if I’m wrong here) snapped that picture at WonderCon and — Yeah. 

I don’t imagine anyone’s waiting on bated breath for the moral authority of the guy who wrote Morbius: The Living Vampire, I’m pretty sure close to 100% of humanity doesn’t give a shit about what I’ve got to say here, but this — combined with the recent horrible treatment of my other pal Janelle (and who knows how many women who dared speak their mind when they, hey, guess what, don’t appreciate being treated like a subspecies because they like something and/or don’t like it when women are portrayed in that thing they like as said subspecies) — makes me feel uncomfortable just sitting back and watching this stuff roll down my screen.  Namely because the other thing I’ve seen people repost is how much some of these assholes love how male comics creators aren’t, to quote, “taking the bait.”

If you’re someone who sees that shirt and realizes why it’s offensive/stupid, there’s no need to click the ‘read more’ here. If you don’t, well, click on.

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Apr 14 '14
Mar 27 '14
Mar 14 '14

X-Men #13

brianwood:

In this upcoming issue, I have this scene with Monet, and I really wanted her to look strong… not comic book superhero-strong, but real life strong, and so I sent artist Clay Mann this shot of Camille LeBlanc-Bazinet:

image

and asked for a build like that on Monet.  Which I got:

image

Love it.

Feb 28 '14

A moment for my comics store, please.

expectyo-patronum:

I read a lot on the internet about the toxic environment of many comic book stores and how sexist they are and demeaning towards women. Which, yes, that culture can often be extremely misogynistic and arrogant and all sorts of awful things.

Which is why I feel like I need a moment to talk about how the people who run my comics store are GREAT. 

I mean, I’m female, I really don’t know much about comics (I come in every few weeks for the next issue of Matt Fraction’s Hawkeye, and that’s it), I’m not very old and I look about four years younger than I am……I’d be a pretty easy target, is what I’m saying. 

Instead, I asked for earlier issues of Hawkeye and the store manager tried for a few weeks to get them in for me instead of just telling me it wasn’t possible. Once, he and one of his employees and a woman who was clearly a frequent customer were conversing about the latest issue of some comic or other while I frantically searched the store for the latest issue of Hawkeye. When I finally confessed that I was clueless, the manager didn’t roll his eyes at me, he just showed me that the new releases sometimes get placed on a different table and had happened to get stacked on top of each other so that the comic I wanted was hidden. Then they all wanted to know why I was so worried, and when I explained about having arranged to discuss the comic with People that evening over Skype, they all were interested and asked for more details, congratulating me at the appropriate points and displaying genuine interest and waving at me as I departed. 

Today, I ventured in yet again for more of my one and only comic. When I checked out, the manager handed me a flyer for a local comics convention and told me that I ought to come, I might be able to get some of the back issues of Hawkeye there. (DOES THIS NOT SOUND LIKE A BIG DEAL TO YOU? THEN YOU HAVE NEVER BEEN A COLLEGE STUDENT WITH THE FACE OF A HIGH SCHOOL FRESHMAN WHO NEVER GETS SPOKEN TO LIKE AN ADULT.) It sounded interesting, too, only I realized that I would be out of the country on those days, and told him so. He asked if I was fleeing to Canada because of the draft, and assured me that America doesn’t force young people to join the army any more. (WHICH I AM A LADY BUT HE STILL TEASED ME ABOUT HAVING TO JOIN THE ARMY LIKE IT WAS TOTALLY NORMAL AND GOODNESS.) 

I am impressed with them, okay? This could easily have been a totally awful experience for me, and I was a little concerned going in, but it turns out that no one there is a jerk at all.

Jan 16 '14

"But girls dont buy the merchandise!" They cry, while I nod and mutter "Yeah, because it’s shit!"

rambosaysso:

There was a post, well a few posts really about how DC generally doesnt give a shit about its female audience because we dont buy the same amount of merchandise or toys or apparel as male fans.

Now today I was shopping and spotted a Wonder Woman t-shirt, so I made a beeline for it. Ready to throw my money at DC, to become a walking billboard and swish around in a snazzy new Wonder Woman shirt.

As soon as I picked it up I put it back down in disgust and headed back to the mens section and picked up a guys Batman tee.

Why? Because emblazoned on the WW shirt were the words, in a glittery font “Girls Night!”.

Below this tshirt was another Womans fitted vest with the boys from the JL on it and the slogan “I need a hero!”.

I dont want to buy this shit. Why can’t they just give us a line of superhero stuff for women without insulting our intelligence?.

Where are my Black Canary knee high fishnet print socks? My Huntress pants? Where is my Mera inspired jewellry range for my more formal needs (because yes. I do require a sensible tiara).

Where is my Big Barda gym bag?

They don’t exist.

So instead I buy the guys stuff and alter it myself but then they assume its a guys money they’re getting.

And action figures? Shit I have ALL THIS FUCKING MONEY TO GIVE YOU DC but you wont give me a set of kick ass women figures that aren’t more offensively proportioned than Barbie herself.

I once saw a Catwoman figure whose waist was as thick as her neck.

Who statistically are the biggest consumers DC? Women. Don’t you dare pretend I aint here waiting to buy stuff, shit give me a utility belt purse with quick draw credit card release and i’ll give you my first born.

I’M LOOKIN’ AT YOU, TOO, MARVEL

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Jan 13 '14
collababortion:

It’s pretty much impossible to take a picture of, but trust me, my ass looks amazing in this dress.

So my back hurt this morning and I was trying to figure out why, and then I remembered doing this.
If there is any one argument that can be made for why the boobs-and-butt pose points to lazy art and shitty visual storytelling, it’s this one.
I took this while still warm after an hour and a half of an intermediate-to-high level yoga class, during which I did this and this and this and this and…you get the picture.  I’m pretty bendy.
So, despite being a generally flexible person, taking this picture was 1. uncomfortable at the time, 2. led to noticeable discomfort the following day, and 3. would have gotten me killed if I used it or something like in any kind of combat - melee or ranged (imagine my phone is a gun or a sword). I mean, you can tell by my face that I could barely get this shot without actually being in PAIN.
Also of note, that side-boob y’all got treated to?  I’m not trying to give anyone fap material or whatever, but mine are not insubstantial boobies, but twisting around like that makes my DDs look not so double. Which means that there is some CRAZY anatomical shit happening in comics if you can see both tits and ass in a shot like this and the tits part of the equation look like you’re smuggling pomelos - like seriously high profile implants or heavily padded tops or just improbably large breasts (which, with the level of fitness expected everywhere else on heroines’ bodies, are even more improbable) with rigid-to-bulletproof levels of support (and if the support is so rigid/bulletproof, how do we see their nipple so often?!).
Anyway.
I’m rambling, but what I’m trying to say here is: My back hurts, and a lot of comic art is dumb as hell.  A LOT.  

collababortion:

It’s pretty much impossible to take a picture of, but trust me, my ass looks amazing in this dress.

So my back hurt this morning and I was trying to figure out why, and then I remembered doing this.

If there is any one argument that can be made for why the boobs-and-butt pose points to lazy art and shitty visual storytelling, it’s this one.

I took this while still warm after an hour and a half of an intermediate-to-high level yoga class, during which I did this and this and this and this and…you get the picture.  I’m pretty bendy.

So, despite being a generally flexible person, taking this picture was 1. uncomfortable at the time, 2. led to noticeable discomfort the following day, and 3. would have gotten me killed if I used it or something like in any kind of combat - melee or ranged (imagine my phone is a gun or a sword). I mean, you can tell by my face that I could barely get this shot without actually being in PAIN.

Also of note, that side-boob y’all got treated to?  I’m not trying to give anyone fap material or whatever, but mine are not insubstantial boobies, but twisting around like that makes my DDs look not so double. Which means that there is some CRAZY anatomical shit happening in comics if you can see both tits and ass in a shot like this and the tits part of the equation look like you’re smuggling pomelos - like seriously high profile implants or heavily padded tops or just improbably large breasts (which, with the level of fitness expected everywhere else on heroines’ bodies, are even more improbable) with rigid-to-bulletproof levels of support (and if the support is so rigid/bulletproof, how do we see their nipple so often?!).

Anyway.

I’m rambling, but what I’m trying to say here is: My back hurts, and a lot of comic art is dumb as hell.  A LOT.  

Dec 22 '13

Buffy to Batgirl: Women and Gender in Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Comics, May 2-3, 2014

wolvensnothere:

Full name / name of organization: 
 
Zara Wilkinson, Rutgers University-Camden
 
contact email: 
 

Rutgers University-Camden
Camden, NJ
May 2-3, 2014

Buffy to Batgirl is an interdisciplinary conference with a focus on women and gender in science fiction, fantasy, and comics. Science fiction and fantasy is a popular genre, as evidenced by the recent success of books, televisions, and films such as The Hunger Games, Game of Thrones, The Walking Dead, The Avengers, and Gravity. These books, television shows, and films include a wide variety of female characters, from protagonists to villains, warriors to “women in refrigerators,” and sidekicks to starship captains.

We invite submissions of individual papers or complete panels on any aspect of female representation in science fiction, fantasy, and comics. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the conference, we seek to represent a range of critical and theoretical approaches as well as a variety of media.

Appropriate topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Women and their place in futuristic or other worlds (Star Trek, Doctor Who, Babylon 5, Firefly)
  • Female protagonists in urban fantasy and paranormal romance (Buffy, Anita Blake, Sookie Stackhouse, Clary Fray)
  • Gender politics after the apocalypse (Revolution, Falling Skies, Oryx and Crake, Y: The Last Man)
  • Female characters in updated/adapted fairy tales (Once Upon a Time, Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters, Snow White and the Huntsman, Grimm)
  • The women of superhero films/television (Marvel Cinematic Universe, Agents of SHIELD, Arrow)
  • Female-focused comic book series (New 52 Batgirl and Wonder Woman, Marvel NOW! X-Men)
  • Horrific women and women in horror (American Horror Story, Carrie, Mama)
  • Science fiction and reproductive body horror (Alien franchise, Twilight, Bloodchild)
  • Cyberpunk and the augmented woman (William Gibson, Neal Stephenson, Charles Stross)
  • Feminism, gender, and sexuality in zombie media TV (Romero, In the Flesh, The Walking Dead)
  • Young female characters, especially in sf/f media for young adults and children (The Hunger Games, Divergent, The Song of the Lionness, His Dark Materials)
  • International aspects of these and other relevant topics and/or papers on science fiction, fantasy, and comics in other languages also encouraged

Buffy to Batgirl is open to all faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars. Undergraduate students may also submit proposals but should include the name of faculty mentor who will assist in the preparation of an appropriate conference presentation.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract and a short bio to buffytobatgirl@gmail.com by January 4, 2014.

Rutgers-Camden, located just across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, is the southernmost campus of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. The campus can be reached from all major transit hubs in Philadelphia, PA, and is accessible by public transportation. Please contact the conference organizers for more information.

cfp categories: 
childrens_literature
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
graduate_conferences
interdisciplinary
popular_culture
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TELL EVERYONE
Dec 21 '13
Dec 20 '13